Interesting/old/Odd Tech (Storage)

Imation 120MB Super disk

The Imation SuperDisk was designed to be a replacement for typical floppy disks and was backward compatible with 3.5″ floppy’s but had a faster read performance due to using the IDE interface instead of the typical floppy connector.

Later a 240MB version was released but with CD burners and USB sticks taking off the product never really got off the ground.

superdiskfront

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And a 120MB disk to suit:

HP SCSI/LAN Card

This was pulled from an old dual P3 server but I thought it was rather interesting due to having a AMD AM79C972BKC LAN controller, a LSI 53C875JE SCSI controller and then an Intel 21152-AB PCI Bus controller all on the same card.

DPT PM3224  PCI SCSI card with 72 pin expandable cache

Another piece I haven’t been able to find a huge amount of information on but have included it as it’s quite an interesting piece and having expandable cache would have been a great feature.

Iomega 100MB ZIP Drive

The Iomega ZIP drive was another attempt like the super disk to become a floppy disk replacement with 100MB, 250MB and eventually a short lived 750MB version.

Again the uptake of CD burners and USB storage caused it’s failure.

Iomega REV Drive 35/70GB

The Iomega REV drive was released in 2009 somewhat as a replacement for the previous Jaz drive.

They used cartridges that contained platters similar to that of a hard drive while the read head was inside the drive.

Late in the products life there was also a 120GB version released, unfortunately due to the design the cartridges could not be used in different sized models.

Unfortunately it would seem quite a bit of the information on the product has since been removed from the internet.

70GB cartridge shown below:

More to come…

One thought on “Interesting/old/Odd Tech (Storage)”

  1. The ZIP Drives are my favorite. I use them a lot with older systems such as PowerPC Macs. But they did not fail due to CD Burners or USB Media Devices I would say. When flash drives came out, they where in the low megabyte range and expensive. I still remember buying my first flash drive. it was 256MB and was $50. By the time that USB Flash Drives and USB Hard Drives became more mainstream for home consumers the ZIP drive was long dead.

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